Recent Paintings


This is a selection of some of my more recent paintings. For more details and how to purchase, please contact me by clicking the kiwi on the contact page. It is also possible to purchase giclée prints of archival quality.


Towards the Mountains, Sicily, Watercolour, (approx 11 by 15in.)

Painted 'en plein air' on a bright autumn day near Campo Felice di Roccella, a town between Palermo and Cefalu. The mountains in Sicily took me by surprise by the their size and dramatic beauty and this painting is looking towards them from the coast. This brings back many happy memories for me.
Boats in the Northerly, Watercolour, (approx 12 by 16in.)

My return to Wellington in 2012 has renewed my acquaintance with the famous wind of 'Windy Wellington'. After a southerly blast direct from the colder parts of Antarctica it turns round and rocks in from the north - a wind that has its counterpart in the notorious mediterranean mistral for annoying gales and fraying at the nerves. However 'it is an ill wind' and at least the northerly in Island Bay brings round the boats to face me when I am drawing or painting them.The variety of boats varies from year to year and from seaon to season, at the moment there are an interesting group of old and new of different sizes.
Stormy Island, Acrylic on Canvas, (36 by 18 in.)

If you live in Wellington you need a taste for the dramatic in weather. A southerly storm gives rise to huge seas breaking in fearsome waves behind the protective cloak for Island Bay which is Tapu Te Ranga island. As a painter I particularly like the day after a storm when the sky clears a bit but the sea is still churning and the colours are at their most radiant. Here's a scene I have painted many times but I never tire of.
Kawau Sunset, Acrylic on Canvas, (approx 12 by 16in.)

A most beautiful part of the world, Kawau Island lies off the coast north of Auckland, most famous for the residence of the colonial Governor Grey and wallabies. No wallabies in this picture though, just a wonderful sunset which I sat and admired – the sky changing aspect every minute it seemed. Which one to grab in a painting?
The other challenge is the wooden jetty which taxed both my patience and perspective skills!
Stac Pollaidh, Acrylic on Canvas, (approx 12 by 16in.)

Stac Pollaidh, in the northלwest of Scotland, is a ancient volcanic plug apparently. It looks like a recipe for extreme vertigo on the side facing the road so I was surprised to learn from a teaching colleague he had walked up there with his daughter - all of 5 years old, if that.
The trick is to go up on the other side.
With the lonely looking house and road it had all the ingredients of the classic Scottish Highland paintings. I refrained from adding a cow!
St Hilaire d'Ozilhan, France, Pastel, (approx 16 by 12in.)

The Languedoc region of France is perhaps not as well known as its neighbour Provence but is just as amazing in its own way. We literally stumbled upon this village with this classic church of the type I like to paint. It was the middle of winter but clear and crisp – not too cold. The village was almost eerily quiet being the afternoon.
Stonehaven Harbour, Watercolour, (approx 6 by 7in.)

A classic harbour scene at the place I first stayed when I arrived in Scotland a few years back. Like much of Scotland the moods of this place change even quicker than back in Wellington, with the harbour a reflecting pond for the boats and buildings around.
Muchalls View, oil on board, (16 by 20in.)

Muchalls had caught my attention out of the corner of my eye whilst driving along the A90 south of Aberdeen to Stonehaven. I noticed the sharp outlines of rock stacks from the window and then found out where to go to get a closer look. This view involved clambering down to the bay in the foreground and then climbing up the other side. I've been told by a local that nearby here is the pool where Ophelia ended up in the Zeffirelli directed film of Hamlet. I'm sure even William himself would recognise that these cliffs 'beetle' with the best of them. Or was that a King Lear line?
Salvator Trump, Acrylic on Canvas, (20 by 16 in.)

The unexhibitable painting! What started out as a gentle satire on the power of money proved a flashpoint for an enraged punter as this painting was torn down from the walls of an exhibition in an Aberdeen pub in late 2011. Not seeing the irony of this depiction of the tycoon he just saw Donald Trump - a divisive figure in the granite city. To some a saviour with his 'greatest golf course in the world', to others he has ridden roughshod over planning laws and the rights of local residents. Me? Well I couldn't possibly comment... STOP PRESS Now Mr Trump is tilting at the presidency the same questions remain!STOP PRESS to STOP PRESS Now he is the president.
Dee Valley Snow, Acrylic on Canvas, (16 by 20in.)

Well I guess it's relief to get away from the highly charged atmosphere of twisted planning regulations, dodgy land deals and environmental destruction. Or is it? From 2007 to 2009 I was lucky enough to live in Cults, Aberdeen - just round the corner from this beautiful vista. It inspired numerous paintings, drawings and watercolours. Now this view has been blocked by a row of houses built on the edge of the floodplain in the foreground. Strangely enough local councillors who'd promised to oppose this development fell mute when the actual vote took place to proceed or not. Sound familiar?
Linn of Quoich, near Braemar, Oil on Canvas, (approx 28 by 20in.)

As you may have realised by now, the beauty of nature is a major inspiration - and few things are more so to my eyes than a waterfall. Although this is hardly in the Niagara category, it's a magical spot as i discovered when I clambered down a bank from the track nearby. As usual though, getting a good view meant balancing on stones in the middle of the stream. Not easy but keeping feet out of the freezing water is an essential in Scotland - even in the summer!
Cefalu, Sicily, Gouache on Two Rivers paper, (approx 10 by 14in. SOLD)

An hour or two along the road from Palermo is the more beautiful and unspoilt harbour town of Cefalu clutching a massive rock outcrop. Thanks to an invite from a wonderful friend and brilliant journalist, Toni McRae, I got the chance to find out that Sicily was a lot more than just the mafia - great architecture, friendly people and pastries, no, I'm not going to say "they're to die for!" I'd love to get back and paint there again.